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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Event Websites

Your event website has 10 seconds to capture a visitor’s interest. That means one mistake could cost you attendees. 

Thanks to website builders like Squarespace and WordPress, there’s little excuse for an ugly or unusable page. However, your event website has 10 seconds to capture a visitor’s interest. That means one mistake could cost you attendees.

Before you waste money trying yet another template or theme, it’s important to find out what makes event websites different from other kinds of sites. Here’s how to differentiate the good from the bad (and the downright ugly) of event websites.

In this ebook, you will learn how to:

  • Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful event websites
  • Write web copy that sells your event without overloading attendees with information
  • Incorporate critical elements that make it easier for people to purchase tickets

Preview

01. Why some event websites suck

You might be asking yourself right about now, “Okay, so what does make an event website beautiful?” And the answer is: you’re asking the wrong question.

Beauty doesn’t necessarily correspond with success. If you want a website that captures interest and turns visitors into attendees, you need to focus on what makes an event website the ultimate salesperson for your event.

According to Eventbrite’s Katie Harris, that’s often easier said than done. “When you know every detail about your event intimately, it’s a blessing and a curse — especially when it comes to your event website. The result is often a site that overwhelms event-goers with information.”

The phenomenon Harris describes is called “the curse of knowledge.” Throughout this guide she and other event website experts will reference real event websites that suffer from this curse — starting with how to avoid information overload.

Information overload

One of the basic tenets of creating content for the web is “less is more.” In fact, a complex design will turn visitors off within 50 milliseconds of viewing your page. While it can be hard to whittle down your event to its essentials, giving event-goers the information they want to hear (vs. what you want to tell) is key.

 

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