$47.79 – $52.99

The Popular is Political: struggles over national culture in 1970s Australi...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

The Mint

10 Macquarie Street

Sydney, NSW 2000

Australia

View Map

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

The 1970s in Australia is remembered as a decade of rapid social change. Women, Indigenous people, lesbians, gays, and migrants all made demands for national recognition. Australia’s shift away from Great Britain and the election of Gough Whitlam saw the advent of the ‘new nationalism’.

In cultural terms, this saw masculinity scrutinized and celebrated as central to a new Australian identity. While the women’s movement’s challenge to Australian norms is well-known, the cultural dimensions of this struggle are less familiar. Historian Marilyn Lake characterised the emergence of the bushman as a ‘national type’ in the 1890s not as the product of nationalist sentiment, but as the result of a contest between men and women for ‘control of the national culture’.

Associate Professor Michelle Arrow will explore how a similar contest unfolded in the popular culture of the 1970s. How did popular culture make sense of the social change of the seventies? Was the popularity of the ocker a reaction to the women’s movement? And how did popular histories on film and television contribute to this cultural contest?

The History Council of NSW presents its 2017 Annual History Lecture at Sydney Living Museums' The Mint during its annual festival, History Week, on Tuesday 5 September 2017. A cocktail reception will follow the lecture.

Supported by Arts NSW, Sydney Living Museums and De Bortoli Wines.

Find out more at our website.

SPECIAL OFFER: Student admission $30. Places are limited, contact us at admin@historycouncilnsw.org.au to claim the offer.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

The Mint

10 Macquarie Street

Sydney, NSW 2000

Australia

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved