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Indigenous Storytelling & Decolonising Methodologies Symposium

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UTS Law Building 5C, Level 2, Room 010 (CB05C.02.010 020)

1 Quay Street

Haymarket, NSW 2000

Australia

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The Indigenous Storytelling and Decolonising Methodologies International Symposium is hosted by Jumbunna Institute UTS in partnership with Te Kotahi Research Institute and with the support of Equity and Diversity Unit and Institute for Sustainable Futures UTS. We are honoured to host Prof Jo-Ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiien who will offer keynote ‘storywork’ guidance for this symposium as we reflect on storytelling as a decolonising methodology for Indigenous scholars, activists and practitioners.

Keynote and Special Guests

Prof Jo-Ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiien is from the Sto:lo and St’at’imc First Nations in British Columbia, Canada, is Professor Emeritus in the Educational Studies Department at the UBC Faculty of Education. She was the former Associate Dean Indigenous Education and the Director of NITEP (UBC’s Indigenous Teacher Education Program). She received a Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) degree from the University of British Columbia, a Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree from Simon Fraser University. Over a 45 year educational career, Jo-ann has been a school teacher, curriculum developer, university administrator and professor. She is the author of Indigenous Storywork: Educating the Heart, Mind, Body, and Spirit.

Special Guest Panelists

Prof Wiremy Doherty (Tuhoe, Ngati Awa) CEO Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi (Aotearoa/NZ)

A/Prof Jenny Lee-Morgan Deputy Director Te Kotahi Research Institute (Waikato, Ngāti Mahuta) (Aotearoa/NZ)

Dr Tracy Bear Nehiyaw’iskwew (Cree woman) (Canada)

Dr. Michelle Johnson-Jennings (Chocktaw Nation) (US)

Dr Romaine Moreton (Goenpul Yugerra, Bundjalung & Bidjara ) (Australia)

Dr Lou Bennett (Yorta Yorta Dja Dja Wurrung) (Australia)

Victor Steffensen (Tagalaka) (Australia)

Convenors: Jason De Santolo (Garrwa/Barunggam) & Prof Larissa Behrendt (Eualeyai/Kamilaroi) &

More info: please email convenor Jason.DeSantolo@uts.edu.au

Speaker Bios

Professor Wiremu Doherty (Tuhoe, Ngāti Awa) is a New Zealand Māori educationalist and academic. He has been appointed CEO at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi. Prior to this appointment, he was Deputy CEO Academic Provost (3 years), Executive Dean (3 years) and Head of School (2 years). Wiremu comes from a background in secondary school teaching and tertiary education. He was Assistant Principal at Saint Stephen’s School, then Principal of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Hoani Waititi Marae. He undertook research for the Ika Whenua land claims in the early 1990’s whilst completing a Masters at the University of Waikato. He then moved to the tertiary sector as Te Amorangi (Maori Director) for Manukau Institute of Technology. Wiremu contributed to the development of Te Reo Maori NCEA Level 1 and 2 in the NZQA framework. He is also a Foundation Touchstone member of the Secondary Schools Futures Project. His PhD focusses on the roots of Mātauranga Maori in tribal based knowledge – Mātauranga-a-Iwi, combining a kaupapa Maori background with experience in imaging future education and its relevance to Maori. Wiremu is the Chair of Ngā Kaitūhono, the Body established by New Zealand Qualifications Authority to ensure Maori content is used appropriately. He is a Director on Te Uru Taumata for Tūhoe, is Deputy Chairman of Manawaru Tribal and newly appointed Chair on the Board of Trustee for Trident High School in Whakatāne. He is the past president of Te Akatea, the National body representing Maori Principals and Deputy Principals, and within this capacity has worked with several Education Ministers and Secretary of Education on numerous initiatives. His whakapapa connections are Tūhoe and Ngāti Awa and he is an active participant in governance, iwi strategic and development issues.

Associate Professor Jenny Lee-Morgan (Waikato, Ngāti Mahuta) has extensive experience and expertise in Māori Education as a whanau member, practitioner, academic and researcher. Formerly, Head of School, Te Puna Wānanga, The University of Auckland, she is currently the Deputy Director of Te Kotahi Research Institute, at The University of Waikato. Her teaching and learning experiences were the impetus for much of her work, including: her book ‘Jade Taniwha: MaoriChinese identity and schooling in Aotearoa’; and subsequent co-authored book ‘Oho Ake: Rehu Marae, Ngā Puna o Waiōrea’ written entirely in te reo Maori. Her most recent co-edited book is ‘Decolonisation in Aotearoa: Education, Research and Practice’. Jenny’s doctoral thesis entitled ‘Ako: Purakau of Maori secondary school teachers’ (Lee, 2008) was seminal in the development of purakau as kaupapa Māori approach to narrative inquiry, and sparked her investigation in pūrākau as Indigenous storywork.

Dr. Tracy Bear is a Nehiyaw’iskwew (Cree woman) academic and member of the Montreal Lake Cree Nation located in Northern Saskatchewan. She recently completed her PhD in English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta with a dissertation entitled “Corporeal Sovereignty Through the Praxis of an Indigenous Eroticanalysis.” Her research is grounded in decolonial methodologies and epistemologies of Indigenous Studies with specific research interests in Indigenous Erotics & Eroticanalysis; Indigenous Feminism, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Sovereignty, Land & Body Politics; Indigenous Queer & Two-Spirit Studies; and Contemporary Indigenous Art. Another central influence for her work is her experience of being a member of the National Collective of Walking With Our Sisters (WWOS). WWOS is a memorial art installation that honours and remembers the over 1400 missing and murdered Indigenous Women, girls and genderful people in Canada. Starting with the 2017/8 academic year, Dr. Bear will be teaching annually an Indigenous Feminisms class in the Department of Women's and Gender Studies as an Assistant Professor in a cross-appointment from Native Studies.

Dr. Michelle Johnson-Jennings (Choctaw Nation) serves as the Executive Director for the RICH Center. An integrated primary care psychologist,she presently serves as Associate to the Dean for Indigenous Research, tenure-track faculty in the College of Pharmacy at theUniversity of Minnesota, Duluth campus and as the Research for Indigenous Community Health (RICH) founding Director RICH is an interdisciplinary College of Pharmacy and School of Medicine center and developed from her research career and motivation to reduce AIAN health disparities. Dr Johnson-Jennings oversees the weekly writing/mentoring workshops with UMD undergraduate, graduate students and junior faculty, resulting in 32 Indigenous health disparities manuscripts in progress. Michelle is currently on a Fulbright Scholarship with Te Kotahi Research Institute.

Dr Romaine Moreton

Goenpul Yugerra of Tjerangeri (Stradbroke Island) and greater Brisbane, Bundjalung and Bidjara of northern New South Wales and Queensland, Dr Romaine Moreton is an internationally recognised writer of poetry, prose and film, she has published over 100 poems, prose and short stories and three anthologies of her poetry, Poems from a Homeland (2012), Post Me to the Prime Minister (2004) and The Callused Stick of Wanting (1996). Romaine’s transmedia work has been the subject of 14 works of criticism (Aust Lit) and 1 PhD (Estelle Castro, University of Paris). Moreton wrote and directed two short films, The Farm (2009) and The Oysterman (2012), and is currently working on three feature films. In 2012 she was one of three Australians commissioned by the prestigious art festival dOCUMENTA(13) to contribute to their Notebooks Series, 100 Notes / 100 Thoughts which includes authors such as Donna Haraway, William Kentridge, Cornelius Castoriadis and Judith Butler. Awarded a PhD from the University of Western Sydney in 2007, her thesis, “The Right to Dream” proposes an Indigenous philosophy of storytelling and embodied knowledge. In March 2016, “One Billion Beats”, an historical excavation of Indigenous representation in Australian cinema woven around Romaine’s personal story, was conceived and performed by Romaine, co-written and co-directed with Alana Valentine, music design by Yorta Yorta Dja Dja Wurrung woman of song Dr Lou Bennett, and visual artistry by Sean Bacon, was presented at Campbelltown Art Centre, NSW to sold out audiences. Romaine is currently writing two theatre works; DJURRA produced by NORPA and directed by Kirk Page, and ONE MORE RIVER TO CROSS, the life story of Wilma Reading, co-written with Wilma Reading, directed by Rachael Maza and produced by ILBIJERRI Theatre Company. Romaine completed her three year appointment as Research Fellow/ Filmmaker-in-Residence in the School of Media, Film and Journalism at Monash University in 2016, and is currently co-Director of Binung Boorigan Pty Ltd, an Indigenous arts based research production company co-founded with Dr Lou Bennett in 2015.

Dr Lou Bennett Yorta Yorta Dja Dja Wurrung, Dr Lou Bennett is a former member of the internationally acclaimed trio Tiddas. Bennett is a consummate performer, playing audiences worldwide. Bennett is a prolific songwriter/composer and during her ten years with Tiddas (1990-2000) penned some of the group’s signature songs. Bennett’s work stretches over a vast area within the Arts industry throughout the past twenty-nine years including her various roles as Performer, Songwriter, Musical and Artistic Director, Composer, Actor, Soundscape and Music Designer and Educator.In 2006 Bennett was one of the co-founders of the Black Arm Band and contributing to all productions by the company. Bennett (Artistic director/Co-CEO) was an instrumental force in the company’s transformative journey from being a one-off ‘special project’, becoming an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander governed, not for profit major performing arts company. In Bennett’s time at the company (2006-2014) she was involved in the touring of five major productions both nationally and internationally. Bennett was a major contributor to the establishment of the company’s community engagement workshop program. Bennett completed her PhD by project at RMIT Melbourne in October 2015. Bennett’s dissertation discusses the importance and relevance of Aboriginal language retrieval, reclamation and regeneration through the medium of the Arts to community health and wellbeing and explores the importance of Indigenous epistemology, methodology and pedagogy in artistic and academic contexts. Bennett uses her own languages of Yorta Yorta and Dja Dja Wurrung, extending to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages that can be retrieved, reclaimed and regenerated through songs, stories and performances. Bennett continues to research the obstacles and ethical issues related to retrieving and transmitting Aboriginal languages cross-culturally and across different generations as the McKenzie Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Victor Steffensen is an Indigenous filmmaker, musician, and consultant reapplying traditional knowledge into the changing world and todays society. He has been interested in traditional knowledge since he was a boy. Victor was inspired by his mother and grandmother's heritage, the Tagalaka people of Northern Queensland and their struggles of losing family through the stolen generation years. His work started in 1995 when he realised the urgent need to record the invaluable wisdom of the Elders before it was lost. Over many years, through his love of the arts, film making, culture and environment, this developed into his life's work; re-engaging traditional practices through creative community projects. Victor believes the best way to influence change is by having fun, re-implementing activities we believe in, and creating education for our children. This is how his work has led to the creation of the Living Knowledge Place, a community driven education site that showcases our culture, our country, and our aspirations for the future of our environment and our wellbeing. Victor is also a master of traditional fire knowledge and believes that traditional fire practice is the answer to preparing our land and our communities for climate change. Victor will be reflecting on his deep knowledge work with traditional fire revitalisation and the Jumbunna Research collaboration.

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UTS Law Building 5C, Level 2, Room 010 (CB05C.02.010 020)

1 Quay Street

Haymarket, NSW 2000

Australia

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