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How to Expose your Work on China to the Global Media?

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Seminar Room 436

Old Teachers College

University of Sydney

Sydney

Australia

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Imagine you have just received a call from a journalist who wants to interview you on issues relating to your China-related research. Would you know where to start and what to do?

If you are a researcher keen to raise your profile and promote your work and expertise to the public, then working with the media, such as giving media interviews and creating content for the media, is one of the most effective ways to achieve that.

The speakers will share their experience from different perspectives. Linda Jaivin, an author, essayist, cultural commentator and journalist with more than thirty years of experience in the media industry across Australia, the US, France and China, will unveil the secret of “what makes one academic a radio bore, never asked back, and another ‘talent’, called on again and again?” Sally Sitou, International Media Adviser at the University of Sydney, will provide real-life examples and practical advice and tips to explain the role of researchers and academics in public debate. She will also outline how to take advantage of opportunities to promote their work and expertise at the University and in the media.

This event will also cover the following topics:
• How do you pitch your message to different media - how to work out the best way to tell your story, whether for an online interview, a radio interview, an essay for a popular publication, and so on?
• How much background information do you need to convey along with your insights, and how to do so in the most effective manner?
• How do you make sure you don’t sound too ‘academic’ and still present the core of your thoughts shortly and memorably?
• How is Chinese media different from media in other countries?
• What should you do if something goes ‘wrong’ during a media interview?

Speakers

Luigi Tomba
Professor Luigi Tomba is the new director of the University of Sydney China Studies Centre. Before joining the Centre in 2017 he was for 15 years at the Australian National University, most recently as the Associate Director of the Australian Centre on China the World. His work has always been concerned with Cities and with urbanization. His most recent book The Government Next Door: Neighborhood Politics in Urban, was awarded the Association of Asian Studies 2016 Joseph Levenson Prize as best book on Post-1900 China.

Linda Jaivin
Linda Jaivin is the author of seven novels and four works of non-fiction including the China memoir The Monkey and the Dragon, the travel companion Beijing and the Quarterly Essay Found in Translation. She is a prolific essayist and cultural commentator on subjects that include China but aren’t limited to it, and a former Hong Kong and Beijing-based journalist. She has had more than thirty years of experience both interviewing people and as being interviewed, including about her own work, for television, radio, print and online media, in Australia, the US, France and China. She has made two radio documentaries for ABC Radio National, one on the subject of privacy and surveillance, Nothing to Hide, and one on the state of arts criticism in Australia, Situation Critical, interviewing a number of people for both programs. She was a regular panellist on the sadly defunct ABC television arts show Critical Mass.

Sally Sitou
Sally Sitou is the international media adviser for the University of Sydney. Prior to that she worked as media and communications manager for AusAID in Samoa and as a media and policy adviser for Federal MP Jason Clare. In 2008, she worked in Beijing as an Australian Youth Ambassador for Development, at Community Alliance, a not-for-profit grassroots organisation which supports the elderly in China.

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Seminar Room 436

Old Teachers College

University of Sydney

Sydney

Australia

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