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A new electricity regime for Queensland: Lunchtime Forum and Brainstorm

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Seminar Room 3

Ground Floor

111 George St

Brisbane, Queensland 4000

Australia

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Can the current national model based on competitive markets adequately transition Queensland to a new but as yet unknown future in energy supply?

This two-part event will feature a keynote speaker presenting on trends in electricity supply, followed by an intensive workshop in brainstorm format to craft some principles on which a new regime might be based.

Both sessions will appeal to those with a direct or indirect interest in electricity, competition policy, technology, emissions and intergovernmental relations. They are open to the public but will particularly suit public servants, parliamentary advisors, business, scholarly experts and civil society engaged in policy formulation. Both sessions will operate under Chatham House rule (no discussion attributed without consent).

Attendees can register for either or both. Both events are free. Attendance for the workshop segment will be limited to approx. 35.

Lunchtime Forum: 12.15 for 12.30 sharp - 1.30 PM

Alan Pears AM, policy analyst, who has advised the Victorian Government and APEC Ministers on electricity reform, will outline emerging trends in energy generation and distribution. He will touch on whether the National Electricity Market is adequately serving Queensland's interests and the relative strengths of a centralised versus distributed regime.

This is the first in a new series of Lunchtime Forums hosted by the Royal Society of Queensland to bridge science and policy. The event is sponsored by the Office of the Chief Scientist of Queensland.

Refreshments from 12.15. Alan Pears will speak from 12.30 until 1.00 PM, followed by 30 minutes open plenary discussion then sandwich refreshments.

Alan Pears, Senior Industry Fellow at RMIT University, has been educated in engineering and teaching. He has been a highly regarded consultant on climate policy, energy efficiency, energy markets and practical design of green buildings, appliances and systems since 1991.

He has been a member of the Victorian Government’s Expert Reference Panel for development of its Energy Efficiency and Productivity Strategy. He is a prominent media commentator, having written more than 30 articles for The Conversation opinion website.

Deliberative Workshop: 2.00 - 4.30 PM

Many elements of Queensland's energy regime have changed since the Electricity Act 1994 was promulgated, to put it mildly. Advancing technology, the east coast National Electricity Market, emissions profiles, ownership, prices, grid reliability and intergovernmental relations are all under critical public and policy review.

The Royal Society of Queensland is pleased to co-host a workshop to examine the emerging future in this field, along with the TJ Ryan Foundation, Queenland's home-grown think tank, and in collaboration with the Department of Energy and Water Supply as sponsor.

This workshop will examine evidence from science, technology and economics in order to produce a set of principles that could guide the Queensland Government in transitioning to an as-yet unknown future in both generation and distribution, via a hypothetical new Electricity Act.

Please note that this workshop will focus on Queensland's statutory electricity regime and the biophysical, technological and socio-economic contexts within which it is evolving. The workshop will not focus on coalmining, coal seam gas, peak oil or other limbs of Queensland's energy mix.

Reconvening after the Lunchtime Forum, the following experts will give short (10 minute) presentations followed by plenary discussion in brainstorm format:

Representative of the Department of Energy and Water Supply - the Government's policy objectives in electricity reform (subject to confirmation).

Prof Ian Lowe - the limits to growth in throughput of energy and materials through the economy.

Michael Gutteridge - world views that shape the debate. As a former entrant in the Darwin-Alice Springs solar car rally, Michael will also speak on the potential for electrification of transport to affect supply-demand dynamics.

Brendan Markey-Towler - the micro-economic model at the heart of the National Electricity Market and the strengths and limitations of competition as an organising principle.

Refreshments will be served.

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Seminar Room 3

Ground Floor

111 George St

Brisbane, Queensland 4000

Australia

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