Free

Workshop: Advocacy For Energy Transitions – Mapping The Dynamics

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

University of Technology Sydney

Building 8, Level 5, Room 1 (CB.08.05.001)

14-18 Ultimo Road

Ultimo, NSW 2007

Australia

View Map

Event description

Description

Workshop

Advocacy For Energy Transitions – Mapping The Dynamics

What are the dynamics of Australia’s transition? How and why is it happening – apparently against the dominant narrative of government policy? What are the economic and social forces driving it? And how fragile is its future? This workshop addresses these questions, applying a range of analytical frameworks. The workshop brings together academics, industry representatives, community advocates for energy transition, and members of NGOs and policy networks. While the focus is primarily on Australia’s energy transition, a number of participants will address overseas examples of transition (Germany, India) and what we can learn from them.

Over the course of the workshop, we’ll be considering the following broad questions, and inviting responses to them. How crucial are State and Federal government policy settings in promoting (or hindering) energy transition? To what extent has the market, rather than policy, driven current developments? What is the interplay between “top-down” and “bottom-up” drivers for transition? What is the desirable balance between small-scale (local) and large-scale corporate-led development? How can we build community support and political consensus for energy transitions? How useful/important are ideas of “energy democracy”, “just transition” and “climate democracy” in strengthening the legitimacy of energy transitions? And are these the right questions to be asking?

Pic: Workers hang hard hats at Hazelwood Power Station, March 2017.

DRAFT PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY 24 OCTOBER, 6-8PM

Public Lecture: ‘We need to talk about the Anthropocene’, Leslie Sklair
Building 4, Level 3, Room 340 (CB04.03.340), Thomas Street, Ultimo

Leslie Sklair is Professor Emeritus at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is currently working on The Anthropocene Media Project, an on-going research project on how the Anthropocene (the geological concept created to measure and name human impacts on the Earth System) is represented in the mass media in local languages all over the world. So far, data has been collected from online searches of newspapers, magazines and other news media websites from around 100 countries/regions by about 50 volunteer researchers. The data is being analyzed by years of publication, numbers and types of articles. The paper concludes with some observations on the role and responsibility of the mass media in interpreting science for various publics. See Sklair, L. (2018). The Anthropocene Media Project. Mass Media on Human Impacts on the Earth System. Visions for Sustainability, 10, May 2018: DOI: 10.13135/2384-8677/2740

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/public-lecture-on-anthropocene-by-professor-leslie-sklair-tickets-50947610675

THURSDAY 25 OCTOBER

9.00 Welcome and Registration

Keynote and Discussion (930-1030) - Climate and energy: global dynamics
Prof. Leslie Sklair, Sociology, London School of Economics
Discussant: Prof. Heather Goodall, University of Technology Sydney
Leslie Sklair is a leading sociologist of globalisation. He is currently working on debates about the Anthropocene. His participation in the workshop is supported by the Climate Justice Research Centre at UTS. Heather Goodall is a political and cultural historian; she has researched and written extensively on environmental history.

10.30-11.00 Morning Tea

Session 1 (11.00-12.15) - Energy transition and the corporate sector
Ian Learmonth, Clean Energy Finance Corporation
Prof Christopher Wright, University of Sydney
Prof Daniel Nyberg, University of Newcastle.
A/Prof Stuart
Rosewarne, Political Economy, University of Sydney
Discussant: Linda Connor, University
of Sydney
This session considers how the corporate energy sector is responding to the process of energy transition, to what extent the imperatives of transition are driving investment decisions, and how corporate priorities and strategies are likely to shape the future of the energy system.

12.15-1.00 Lunch

Session 2 (1pm- 2.15 pm) - Energy transition and the ‘energy market
Prof Frank Jotzo, Crawford School, ANU
Craig Memery, Public Interest Advocacy Centre, Sydney
Discussant: A/Prof Devleena Ghosh, UTS
In the context of the dynamic interplay of energy markets, technology and policy, this session considers the role of the energy market in driving the process of energy transition, and what kinds of policy frameworks can provide incentives for this process. It also explores the tension between centralized and decentralized models of energy production in the context of energy markets.

Session 3 (2.30-3.45 pm) - Community-based energy and ‘energy democracy’
Heather Smith, Changing Weather blog + Coalition for Community Energy
Dr Sven Teske, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS
Discussant: Dr Jon Marshall, Centre for Climate Justice, UTS
Drawing on the experiences of local communities that are undergoing energy transition, this session considers possible models of, and blueprints for, transition at local and regional levels, and considers how the promotion of energy democracy can contribute to this process.

3.45-4.15 Afternoon tea

Public forum (4.30-6pm) - Advocating for Energy Transition
Lisa Lumsden, Repower Port Augusta
Daniel Spencer ASU (formerly AYCC and Repower Port Augusta)
Ron Ipsen, Voices of the Valley
Cameron Reid AGL
Lance McCallum, ACTU

Energy policy is repeatedly stalled at the national level in Australia. Yet energy transition is already underway in a range of regions and localities across Australia. There is a large-scale community response to expanded coal and coal seam gas, with a new dialogue for regional 'renewal', beyond fossil fuels. There is direct local involvement in ceating energy alternatives with the closure of aged coal-fired generators. And there are State-level initiatives to create new energy systems. The pressure for transition has redefined agendas for justice, for community participation and for democratic involvement. What are the common themes across communities advocating for energy transition? What are the lessons for energy justice, just transition and energy democracy? How can we build community support and political consensus for energy transitions?

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/public-forum-advocating-for-energy-transition-tickets-51053240617

FRIDAY 26 OCTOBER

Session 4 (9.30-11.00am) - Energy transition, political leadership, law
Hon. Jay Weatherill, former Premier of South Australia
Prof Robyn Eckersley, Political Science, University of Melbourne
Dr Anne Kallies, Business and Law, RMIT University
Discussant: TBC
This session will focus on the role of government policy settings and political leadership in hindering or promoting the process of energy transition. It explores how governments can respond to the so-called energy trilemma: providing reliable, affordable and environmentally sustainable energy supply.

11.00-11.30 Morning tea

Session 5 (11.30 -12.45 pm) Building social legitimacy (1) – Energy Transitions, Labour and Community Ownership
Dr Chris Briggs,
Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS
Dr Franziska Mey, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS
Dr Rebecca Pearse and Dr Gareth Bryant, Political Economy,
University of Sydney
Discussant: Lance McCallum, ACTU
Energy transitions have direct and immediate implications for workers and communities. Yet too often their priorities and concerns are at best a secondary consideration for governments and other players seeking to leverage opportunities in the emergent ‘green economy’. Historically, the active involvement and ownership of communities and workers, building constituencies for transition in the development of renewable energy, has been critical. How can this be maximised, to secure legitimacy on the ground for energy transitions?

12.45-1.30 Lunch

Session 6 (1.30 – 2.30) - Building social legitimacy (2) Regional Transitions
Dr Hedda Askland, Anthropology, University of Newcastle
Prof John Wiseman,
Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute
Dr
Amanda Cahill, Next Economy Project, Centre For Social Change
Discussant: tbc
Energy transitions involve both the ‘phase-out’ of fossil fuel-based energy and the ‘phase-in’ of renewable energy. Existing energy regions are undergoing extensive transformation, and new energy regions are emerging. How are these changes proceeding – what is driving change and to what extent are they planned, for instance to address social justice concerns? How far are they contested and redefined by public involvement?

Session
7 2.45 – 3.45 Building social legitimacy (3) Public advocacy, policy networks, communicating transition
A/Prof James Goodman, Climate Justice Research Centre, UTS
Prof Chris Reidy,
Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS
Dr Jahnnabi Das and A/Prof Tom Morton, Journalism and
Climate Justice Research Centre, UTS
Discussant: tbc
This session will explore the communication strategies and practices of various actors, such as scientists, NGOs, policy networks, activists, and media professionals, in advocating for energy transition, and how these can contribute to building a political constituency and social acceptance for transition.

Afternoon Tea 3.45 – 4.15

Closing Roundtable (4.15 -5.00pm) - Public Legitimacy for Renewable Energy
Chair: A/Prof Tom Morton, Climate Justice Research Centre, UTS
The closing session will draw on the previous sessions to outline an agenda for further research on socio-political dynamics of energy transition, the role of energy democracy in promoting such a transition, the nature of a “just transition”, and how it might be achieved.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

University of Technology Sydney

Building 8, Level 5, Room 1 (CB.08.05.001)

14-18 Ultimo Road

Ultimo, NSW 2007

Australia

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved