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What lies beneath India’s superbug epidemic?

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Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room

University of Melbourne

761 Swanston Street

Parkville, VIC 3010

Australia

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What lies beneath India’s superbug epidemic? The politics and economies of resistance

India is at the centre of one of the world’s most pressing crises: antimicrobial resistance (AMR). A report commissioned by the British government in 2018 estimated that, worldwide, more than 700,000 people die each year from illnesses attributed to AMR.

While the scale of AMR in India is hard to track, its population, vulnerabilities and structural conditions mean that the country will play a key role in mitigating the global AMR challenge.

There is a diverse range of cultural, social and economic reasons for the spread of AMR in India. Australia can help harness interdisciplinary expertise and powerful university-industry partnerships with clinicians, government and civil society to improve the understanding of infective risk to inform the current and future governance of antibiotics in India and globally.

Join the Australia India Institute and Global Health Alliance for a Question Marks Seminar to explore how Australia and India can work together to respond to the growing AMR crisis.

What are the social drivers behind AMR in India? How does cultural practice determine antibiotic usage?

All guests are cordially invited for networking drinks following the seminar from 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm.

THE PANEL

Professor Assa Doron, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies at the College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University. Prof. Doron’s main areas of interest include urban anthropology, development studies, media and public health. Doron is currently working on public health and antimicrobial resistance in India in collaboration with Alex Broom. Their recent article, ‘The Spectre of Superbugs: Waste, Structural Violence and Antimicrobial Resistance in India’, is available in the open access journal Worldwide Waste. (2019).

Professor Alex Broom, Co-Director, Practical Justice Initiative, Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW Sydney. Prof. Broom is an international leader in the sociology of health and illness, utilising highly innovative qualitative methodologies and social theory to provide novel understandings of the social, cultural, political and economic underpinnings of the key health challenges of the 21st Century. Within this work, he is particularly interested in issues related to human subjectivities, vulnerability, social justice and solidarity. His current focus is on developing critical analyses of the social dynamics of cancer and palliative care and the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance across contexts and cultures.

A/Professor Kirsty Buising, Acting Director, Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital. A/Professor Bruising is an infectious diseases physician who also serves as deputy director of the National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship and chief investigator for the NHMRC-funded Centre for Research Excellence in Antimicrobial Stewardship. Kirsty holds an appointment as a clinical research physician at the Royal Melbourne Hospital leading research and development for the Guidance Group, serving as its executive director. Kirsty is a theme leader for antimicrobial resistance at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity and clinical leader of the Infection Clinical Network at Safer Care Victoria. Kirsty serves on advisory groups at state, national and international levels in the areas of antimicrobial stewardship, guideline development and healthcare-associated infection.

Dr Annaliese van Diemen, AMR Policy Advisor, Victorian Department of Health and Human Services. Dr Van Diemen is a Public Health Physician and General Practitioner. Prior to her current role, she led the Communicable Disease Prevention & Control team at DHHS, managing the public health response to notifiable conditions in Victoria. She has worked with a number of health services in Victoria in responding to outbreaks of resistant organisms, including CPE and C.Auris, and has had ongoing engagement with the Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory to progress the implementation of microbial whole genome sequencing and associated epidemiological analysis of resistance in notifiable conditions in Victoria.


CHAIR

Misha Coleman, Executive Director, Global Health Alliance. Since 2016 Misha has led the Alliance, which is a peak body for global health organisations in Australia and which has focussed heavily on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as one of the world’s most wicked global health challenges. The Alliance is part of the US Government’s Antimicrobial Challenge which is a yearlong effort to fight AMR across the globe. Misha recently chaired a Roundtable on AMR in India - in collaboration with the Victorian Government - and she was recently part of a delegation to India looking at ways to combat the rise of multidrug-resistant TB there. In 2018 Misha co-authored Victoria’s first International Health Sector Capacity Report, which highlighted the capacity of Victorian institutions to combat antimicrobial resistance in Australia and the Indo-Pacific region.



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Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room

University of Melbourne

761 Swanston Street

Parkville, VIC 3010

Australia

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