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What is citizen science, for whom and to what end?

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The University of Sydney, Building/Room to be advised

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Camperdown, NSW 2006

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What is citizen science, for whom and to what end? Participation, collaboration and inclusion in science for a healthier society

About this event

This collaborative forum between the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC) Citizen Science node and the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies will provide opportunities to engage with several areas of scholarly provocation regarding citizen science. Through a half-day program, we aim to:

• Explore and debate a diverse range of perspectives on participatory science such as citizen science, community based participatory research, consumer and community involvement in research, and community science;

• Deepen our understandings about the role of participatory science in advancing science and knowledge translation, leading to a healthier society; and

• Discuss critical principles of doing participatory research – including those of Diversity and Inclusion, Expert/Power/Equality

REGISTRATION

Registration is essential. You MUST be a CPC or University of Sydney staff member or student to attend this event in person.

Non CPC and USyd attendees may attend virtually via Zoom, and can register here: https://tinyurl.com/mwuh7nk

PROGRAM

This half-day event will include addresses and panels from key CPC and SCHS contributors, and affiliated citizen science scholars, concluding with a networking lunch for in-person attendees.

10:00 – 10:05 Welcome (Professor Yun-Hee Jeon, Susan Wakil School of Nursing; Citizen Science node Lead)

10:05– 10:15 Opening Address (Professor Don Nutbeam, Director, Sydney Health Partners)

10:15 – 10:45 Quickfire Addresses: 'What does participatory science mean to you and in your field of research?' (5 minute addresses by Dr Katherine Kenny, Deputy Director, Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, School of Social and Political Sciences; Dr Erin Roger, Australian Citizen Science Association and ALSA/CSIRO; Dr Sam Robotham, Menzies Centre for Health Policy and Economics, School of Public Health; Dr Yaela Golumbic, School of Chemistry; Dr Ozgur Gocer, School of Architecture, Design and Planning)

10:45– 11:10 Keynote Address: 'Culture and citizen science: Aboriginal research as a model for citizen science' (Professor Jaky Troy Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research)

11:10 – 11:25 Plenary Address: 'What questions should we ask first: Multi-dimensional costs of non-participatory science, research and training practices' (Professor Alex Broom, Director, Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies )

11:25 - 11:40 Public Involvement Panel: 'How best can we push the agenda for participatory science and community engagement? Consumer and Community Involvement perspectives' (John Quinn and Glenys Petrie, StepUp for Dementia Research)

11:40 – 12:20 Panel discussion: 'Diversity and Inclusion, Expert and Equality, and Ethics and Rigour in participatory science' (Facilitated by Associate Professor Alice Motion, School of Chemistry; Citizen Science node Co-lead)

12:20 – 12:30 Closing Address (Professor Steve Simpson, Director, Charles Perkins Centre)

12:30 – 1.30 Lunch and networking

ABOUT THE CPC CITIZEN SCIENCE NODE

Established in 2019, the CPC Citizen Science node has been leading and participating in a broad range of citizen science endeavours, including partnerships with the Australian Citizen Science Association. Since 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged all of us at personal and societal levels, illustrating in particularly vivid ways many of the nuanced interconnections between science and the citizenry. Importantly, the pandemic has created new opportunities, especially a growing recognition of and need for the voice of the public and communities to be central to advancing science and forging healthy societies. Under the banner of Co-creation, Collaboration and Translation of Science with the Public, our vision is to become a world leading hub for the advancement of citizen science that is ethically attuned and methodologically rigorous. In commemorating our two-year anniversary, we are cordially inviting you to this joint forum with the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies.

ABOUT THE SYDNEY CENTRE FOR HEALTHY SOCIETIES

The SCHS was established in 2020, with the central aim of harnessing social science, humanities, and interdisciplinary expertise to understand and transform how health and social life intersect on our changing planet. While often seen as a characteristic of individuals, the SCHS recognises that 'health' is also collectively produced via social practices and economic and political systems. How we ‘treat’ health, then, must move beyond focusing on individuals to instead encompass a more multidimensional approach. Through dynamic teamwork, and underpinned by a deeply collaborative philosophy, the SCHS draws together leading experts from around the world and across a diverse set of disciplines and fields. Its work highlights how historical context, political arrangements, economic structures, enduring inequalities, and interspecies and environmental relations both produce health problems and might map paths to new solutions.

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Date and time

Location

The University of Sydney, Building/Room to be advised

Room and building

To be advised

Camperdown, NSW 2006

Australia

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Organizer Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies

Organizer of What is citizen science, for whom and to what end?

Synthesising different disciplinary approaches across scales of observation - from the microbial to the planetary - the work of the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies highlights how historical context, political arrangements, economic structures, enduring inequalities, and interspecies and environmental relations both produce health problems and might map paths to new solutions.

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