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Sydney Ideas - Globalisation

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The University of Sydney

The Quadrangle A14

General Lecture Theatre

Camperdown, NSW 2006

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The Thinker's Guide to the 21st Century series of forums brings together the University of Sydney thinkers from the disciplines of History, Politics, Economics, and Philosophy to help us navigate the key concepts tossed around in the contemporary political debate and news.


Wednesday 25 October - GLOBALISATION

There is no word with more purchase in present political discourse than Globalisation. But what does it mean, and why is it so important? This panel surveys the extent of today’s globalization, and asks: How globalised is the world really? What is the significance of this idea for politics? Is globalisation good for us? Does the European Union still represent a future in which the world is growing closer together? Or have we arrived at an impasse and begun to fragment around nationalist economics and ideologies?

Join Professor John Romalis, a University of Sydney specialist in international economics, and Sabina Selchow, a political scientist who studies the global, to consider these questions, and find some alternative views, at the last of our Thinkers panels for 2017.

Speakers:

  • Thomas Adams, Lecturer in American Studies and History at the United States Studies Centre Dept of History, the University of Sydney
  • Professor Glenda Sluga, ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of International History, the University of Sydney
  • Professor John Romalis, Sir Hermann Black Professor in Economics, School of Economics, the University of Sydney
  • Dr Sabina Selchow, Fellow in the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, Department of International Development, London School of Economics
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Date and Time

Location

The University of Sydney

The Quadrangle A14

General Lecture Theatre

Camperdown, NSW 2006

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