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Salmon and Acorns Feed Our People

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New Law Foyer

Sydney Law School

Eastern Avenue

University of Sydney, NSW 2006

Australia

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A Sydney Environment Institute event.

About this Event

Join visiting scholar Professor Kar Marie Norgaard, in conversation with Professor Jakelin Troy, as they discuss violence and denial, cultural identity and Norgaard's latest book Salmon and Acorns Feed Our People.

Once the third largest salmon-producing stream in the Western United States, the Klamath River has, as of 2014, fallen to only 4% of its previous productivity. This gives the once wealthy Karuk Tribe the dubious honor of having one of the most dramatic and recent diet shifts in North America. Unable to fulfil their traditional fishermen roles, Karuk people are now among the most impoverished in the state.

In Salmon and Acorns Feed Our People, noted environmental sociologist Kari Norgaard draws upon nearly two decades of examples and insight from Karuk experiences on the Klamath River to illustrate how the ecological dynamics of settler-colonialism are essential for expanding theoretical conversations on health, identity, food, race, and gender that preoccupy many disciplines today.

About the Speakers

Kari Norgaard is Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies at University of Oregon. Her current work focuses on the social organisation of denial (especially regarding climate change), and environmental justice and climate work with the Karuk Tribe on the Klamath River.

Jakelin Troy is the Director of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research at the University of Sydney. Jakelin's research focuses on documenting, describing and reviving Indigenous languages. She is Aboriginal Australian and her community is Ngarigu of the Snowy Mountains in south eastern Australia.

David Schlosberg (chair) is Professor of Environmental Politics in the Department of Government and International Relations, Payne-Scott Professor, and Director of the Sydney Environment Institute at the University of Sydney. He is known for his work in environmental politics, environmental movements, and political theory.

This event is part of the Sydney Environment Institute's Sites of Violence research project. More information, here.

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Date and Time

Location

New Law Foyer

Sydney Law School

Eastern Avenue

University of Sydney, NSW 2006

Australia

View Map

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