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Presynaptic Dysfunction and Disease Symposium

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To coincide with our upcoming Special Issue, this online symposium is FREE to register.

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Efficient neurotransmission is dependent on the ability of the presynapse to maintain neurotransmitter release, however aberrant presynaptic function can also lead to pathogenic consequences and disease. In recent years, mutations in the genes encoding many presynaptic proteins have been implicated in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. This symposium coincides with the release of the Journal of Neurochemistry Special Issue, entitled Presynaptic Dysfunction and Disease and features talks from the issue contributors. The symposium will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of key presynaptic proteins and their role in disease pathogenesis.

Link will be sent following registration.

Speakers:

Holly Melland (The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Australia): Mechanistic insights into synaptotagmin-1-associated neurodevelopmental disorder

Dr Karen Smillie (University of Edinburgh, UK): Synaptic Vesicle Recycling is disrupted in a mouse model of Huntington's Disease

Dr Francesca Pischedda (Università degli Studi di Trento, Italy): Dissecting the impact of LRRK2 PD mutations at the presynaptic site

Melina Overhoff (University of Cologne, Germany): Autophagy regulates PKA signaling to maintain synaptic communication

Dr Katherine Bonnycastle (University of Edinburgh, UK): Fragile X mental retardation protein sustains presynaptic function via control of activity-dependent bulk endocytosis

Dr Jacqueline Burre (Weill Cornell Medicine, USA): STXBP1 encephalopathies: Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

Dr Kate Baker (University of Cambridge, UK): Mapping the neurodevelopmental spectrum of synaptic vesicle cycling disorders

Dr Gabriele Lignani (University College London, UK): Manipulation of Kv1.1 expression to reduce neuronal excitability as therapy for neurological diseases

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