Free

Political disenchantment in France & the election of Emmanuel Macron

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Elisabeth Murdoch Building

Spencer Rd

Theatre

Parkville, VIC 3052

Australia

View Map

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

The deep crisis of trust of the French with regard to policy in general and to the forces of government in particular, was expressed in French voters’ aspirations for what one of the candidates (Jean-Luc Mélenchon, extreme-left) called "dégagisme" ("get-outism"), a slogan taken from the mantra of the Tunisian demonstrators during the "Arab Spring", which demanded the resignation of the dictator Ben Ali.

These aspirations were strongly demonstrated during the recent French elections, by abstention, by vote for populist forces or by voting for Macron. Emmanuel Macron, who emerged on the political scene less than a year ago and has never previously been a candidate in an election, embodies an unprecedented form of protest voting while being a committed defender of the European Union and a culturally open society that is liberal in terms of morals.

In a climate of opinion at a European and even international scale (in which the domino theory seemed to predict a victory of the populists in the Netherlands, Austria and then in France after the victory of the Brexit campaign and Donald Trump); the victory of Macron appeared as a surprise and as a relief for the continuation of the project of European construction. Hence the enthusiasm that his victory has generated beyond the borders of France. But what about within France itself?

After the presidential and legislative elections, France appears divided into four ideological blocks, with a major sociological division (as in other countries) between the winners and the losers of globalization. This ideological and sociological reconfiguration resulted in a major reorganization of the French partisan system after the legislative elections gave majority to the new party created by Macron, with elected deputies who were often first time candidates in the legislative elections. Other political forces of government were swept aside, and the populist forces gained very few seats due to the voting system.

Professor Arnaud will consider the state of political disenchantment of French citizens, the motivations driving the Macron vote, the sociological and ideological divisions within France, and the partisan restructuring at work.

Download the event flyer

Speaker:

Arnaud Mercier is Professor of Information and Political Communication at the University of Paris 2 Pantheon-Assas. He is also president and chairman of the board of The Conversation France. He conducts research on journalism, social media in electoral context and political communication. He has recently published in co-direction Political Campaigning on Twitter: the EU Elections 2014 in the digital public sphere.

Misha Ketchell, Editor of The Conversation, will chair this seminar and Dr Maryse Helbert, Melbourne School of Government, will be a discussant.

This seminar is co-presented by the Embassy of France (Canberra), The Alliance Française, The Conversation, Election Watch at the Melbourne School of Government and the EU Centre on Shared Complex Challenges.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Elisabeth Murdoch Building

Spencer Rd

Theatre

Parkville, VIC 3052

Australia

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved