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Louise Hanson-Dyer Music Colloquia

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Heinze Room

Melbourne Conservatorium of Music

Royal Parade

Parkville, VIC

Australia

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The following series of colloquia perpetuates the legacy and cultural impact of Melburnian music patron and publisher Louise Hanson-Dyer (1884–1962) – founder of Éditions de l’Oiseau-Lyre – by bringing cutting-edge issues in music research to a public forum for discussion and debate.

TUESDAY 6 MARCH, 5.00PM
INFANTILISATION AND CREATIVE PERFORMANCE
Daniel Leech-Wilkinson (King's College London)

The idea that in western art music a performer’s job is to reproduce a composer’s intentions is so deeply embedded that decades of scepticism from musicology has had little impact on belief, teaching or practice. It tightly constrains performers’ creativity and leads them to believe that such constraints are good, while at the same time causing widespread psychological and professional insecurity. Why is fear of innovation in musical communication so deep-seated? Various reasons are explored including music’s evocation of infant/carer vocalisation and its modelling of communication with a perfect Being. A liberated approach to performance will be proposed and illustrated.


TUESDAY 10 APRIL, 5.00PM
THE PUZZLE OF DRESDEN’S COLLECTION OF SACRED MUSIC BY BALDASSARE GALUPPI 'DETTO BURANELLO' (1706–1785)
Janice Stockigt (Melbourne Conservatorium of Music)

Robert Browning's evocative poem "A Toccata of Galuppi's" (1855) probably has led to this Venetian composer being better known in literary rather than musical circles. Yet, in the mid eighteenth century, Galuppi's music both sacred and secular was feted throughout Europe, England, and as far north as Russia. In Dresden by 1756 seven of Galuppi's operas had been performed at the famed opera house, whereas in 1765 at least seventy-three sacred works attributed to him were entered into the music catalogue of the recently built Catholic court church (Hofkirche). Investigations into the purpose of this somewhat mystifying collection of sacred music have revealed the deviousness of the Venetian copyist and supplier, Iseppo Baldan, while the original destination of these sacred works might not have been Dresden (as previously thought) but Warsaw, where the King of Poland and Elector of Saxony, August III, was sent into exile at the outbreak of the Seven Years War by Frederick (the Great) of Prussia.


TUESDAY 15 MAY, 5.00PM
THE ARTIST VS THE AUDIENCE: MUSICAL POLITICS IN MID-NINETEENTH-CENTURY GERMANY
David Larkin (University of Sydney)

Music history is littered with examples of works now considered masterpieces which initially were rejected by audiences and critics. In the politically fraught world of mid-nineteenth-century Germany, such bruising encounters were common for those of progressive inclinations. Painted as Zukunftsmusiker (musicians of the future, i.e. not acceptable at the time), composers such as Liszt and Wagner took the fight to their opponents by writing pamphlets justifying their art. They refused to be trammelled by existing norms and appealed to the concept of progress as justification for their departures from orthodoxy in matters of form and harmony. This colloquium explores this contested terrain in the aftermath of the 1848-9 revolutions, interrogating how both sides understood the relationship between composers and the audiences of the day.



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Location

Heinze Room

Melbourne Conservatorium of Music

Royal Parade

Parkville, VIC

Australia

View Map

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