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International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples symposium

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The Forum, Melbourne Connect

700 Swanston Street

Carlton, VIC 3053

Australia

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Please join the Indigenous Knowledge Institute to celebrate the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples on Monday 9 August.

About this event

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples marks the day of the first meeting, in 1982, of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights.

To recognise this day, the Indigenous Knowledge Institute is hosting a one-day symposium to showcase and celebrate a variety of Indigenous knowledges from across the University of Melbourne and the community. We will discuss ways to draw Indigenous knowledges into the policy and education spaces.

Morning tea, lunch, and afternoon tea will be provided. If you would like to attend for the whole day, please book a ticket for both 'Morning' and 'Afternoon' sessions.

In the event of a COVID-19 lockdown or further restrictions, this event will be delivered online.

Confirmed speakers can be found below (this list will be updated).

Morning session:

Geraldine Atkinson is a proud Bangerang/Wiradjuri woman and Co-Chair of the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria. For over 40 years, Geraldine has been instrumental in driving government and policy reform in Aboriginal education. From starting in the field as an Aboriginal teacher’s aide in 1976, Geraldine moved forward to become the President of the Victorian Aboriginal Education Association Inc., a role she has held since 1999.

Marcus Stewart is a Nira illim bulluk man of the Taungurung Nation and Co-Chair of the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria. Prior to being elected to the Assembly, Marcus was the Chief Executive Officer of the Federation of Victorian Traditional Owner Corporations, a position to which he was appointed in 2017. During his time at the Federation, he oversaw that peak body’s call to State Government to pledge $63.4 million towards a Treaty readiness package, which would ensure Traditional Owner groups could prepare for Treaty engagement and negotiation processes.

Professor Liz McKinley

Dr Kirsty Sword Gusmão AO was educated at the University of Melbourne and Monash University. For two decades, Kirsty worked for Timor-Leste to realise its right to self-determination and, after the nation became independent in 2002, has contributed to the rebuilding of the country through her women's organisation, the Alola Foundation, and a range of education-related initiatives. As the Chair of Timor-Leste's first National Commission for UNESCO, she advocated for a greater role for Timor-Leste's 17 indigenous languages in the education system and a more prominent role for indigenous knowledge systems in national development.

Duane Hamacher is Associate Professor of Cultural Astronomy in the ASTRO-3D Centre of Excellence and the School of Physics at the University of Melbourne. His work specialises in the intersection of astronomy with culture, heritage, history, and society. He earned graduate degrees in astrophysics and the social sciences and is leading initiatives in Indigenous astronomy and dark sky studies.

Afternoon session:

Professor Barry Judd is the Director of Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne. He was awarded his PhD by Monash in 2007. His thesis ‘Australian Game, Australian Identity: (Post)colonial Identity in Football’ explored formations of identity in the sport of Australian (Rules) Football.

Dr Justin Wejak is an Indigenous ethnographer from the eastern Indonesian island of Lembata. He currently teaches in the Indonesian Studies program at the University of Melbourne. Justin studied philosophy in Indonesia and theology and anthropology in Melbourne. For his PhD completed in 2017 at the University of Melbourne, he undertook an autoethnographic analysis of cultures of fear amongst Eastern Indonesian Catholics. By exploring the feelings of fear triggered by an Indonesian propaganda text connected with the killings of communists in Indonesia in 1965-6, he argued that Eastern Indonesian Catholic experiences of fear are simultaneously secular, religious and supernatural.

Professor Aaron Corn is the Inaugural Director of the Indigenous Knowledge Institute at the University of Melbourne. He has a research background in music, collections and Indigenous knowledge and collaborates closely in research with Indigenous colleagues and communities. Aaron's research investigates new strategies for strengthening human cultural diversity in the digital age with emphasis on the durability of Indigenous knowledge across generations and cultures.

Professor Marcia Langton AO holds the positions of Associate Provost and Foundation Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne. She is the Director of the Indigenous Studies Unit, Centre for Health Equity, in the School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne. Marcia has produced large bodies of work in political and legal anthropology, Indigenous agreements and engagement with the minerals industry, and Indigenous culture and art.

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Date and time

Location

The Forum, Melbourne Connect

700 Swanston Street

Carlton, VIC 3053

Australia

View Map

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Organiser Indigenous Knowledge Institute

Organiser of International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples symposium

The Indigenous Knowledge Institute aims to advance research and education in Indigenous knowledge systems.

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