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Turner Hall

19 Mary Ann St

Ultimo

Sydney

Australia

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Indigenous perspectives on climate change: dialogues between descendants and ancestors.

In this public lecture, we hear Indigenous perspectives on climate change. Indigenous peoples are at the forefront in redefining society for a climate-changing world. At the same time, the impact of climate change on an Indigenous country, water and ecology find both allies and elision in climate change policy and activism. Indigenous actors balance their responsibility to ancestral land with the interests of future generations, all the while, remaining conscious of the urgent political and economic matters that face their communities today. Join us as we explore different dimensions of Indigenous Climate Justice, addressing parallel contexts of North America and Australia.

Indigenous philosopher Kyle Whyte, from the Potawatomi Nation, discusses the moral and political issues concerning climate policy and Indigenous peoples and the ethics of cooperative relationships. Fred Hooper and Rene Woods share their water sovereignty research and advocacy on cultural flows to restore spiritual, cultural, and environmental valuesin Aboriginal worlds.

Reception from 5.30pm for a 6pm start.

Turner Hall is a 10-minute walk from Central Station. Metered street parking is available on Thomas St and Quay St. A ramp is located at the rear of Turner Hall near Building A.



Speakers

Associate Professor Kyle Powys Whyte
Kyle Powys Whyte is the Timnick Chair in the Humanities at Michigan State University. He is a Potawatomi man and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. His research and activism focus on the problems and possibilities Indigenous peoples face regarding climate change, environmental justice, and food sovereignty; the moral and political issues concerning climate policy and Indigenous peoples and the ethics of cooperative relationships between Indigenous peoples and climate science organizations. His recent published work relates to Indigenous critiques of concepts of the Anthropocene.

Fred Hooper
Fred Hooper is a Murrawarri man from northern NSW, where he grew up on the banks of the Culgoa River. He has served in the Australian Navy and worked in both government and community organisations across the country. In 2013 he was responsible for the Murrawarri people declaring their continued Independence and Statehood from the Crown of Great Britain and is the Chairperson of the Murrawarri Provisional Council of State. He is the Chairperson of the Northern Basin Aboriginal Nations and works tirelessly to progress water interests for Aboriginal people in the Murray-Darling Basin.

Rene Woods
Rene Woods is a Nari Nari man from south-west New South Wales in Australia. Rene has been involved with the management of Aboriginal culture, heritage and natural resources for many years, and is currently working as an Aboriginal Heritage Conservation Officer in the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. As chairperson of the Murray Lower Darling Rivers Indigenous Nations, Rene represented the southern Murray Darling Basin nations on the National Cultural Flows Research Project and takes an active role in helping governments at the state and federal level to understand the importance of cultural flows. Rene is vice-chairperson of the Nari Nari Tribal Council and holds a seat on the Toogimbie IPA advisory group.

Professor Heidi Norman (Chair)
Heidi Norman is an Associate Professor in Social and Political Sciences in the School of Communication and the Director of the Indigenous Economies Research Network at UTS. She researches and publishes in the areas of NSW Aboriginal history and politics with a particular focus on land and its management and the Aboriginal administrative domain. Her most recent work is a study of Aboriginal Land rights in NSW (published in 2015). This work is a critical account of the interface between the Government’s construction of Aboriginal interests in land and the emerging governance of those land and interests by Aboriginal citizens through their land councils. Her new area of research is focused on Aboriginal people’s interests in pursuing land management and cultural aspirations on their land, alongside imperatives to pursue economic development.

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Turner Hall

19 Mary Ann St

Ultimo

Sydney

Australia

View Map

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