$40 – $170

HTASA: History: Known and Unknown - 31st August 2018

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University of Adelaide Club

Victoria Drive

Adelaide, SA 5005

Australia

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Refunds up to 1 day before event

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HTASA Presents History: Known and Unknown.

Workshops presented by Middle and Secondary Years Teachers, as well as experts on the Australian Curriculum, and the effective teaching of historical skills of inquiry. Specific workshops will also be held on the Senior SACE Modern History and Ancient Studies Curriculum.

Early-bird is before close of business 24th August 2018

Keynote Speakers:

Ashley Ekins

As we approach the centenary of the end of the First World War of 1914-18, it is timely to explore the enduring impact and consequences of that conflict. In this talk, Ashley Ekins will examine the allied “advance to victory” in 1918 and describe how the Armistice of 11 November, after more than four long years of war, affected soldiers
on the front line, those in the rear areas, and people on the home front. In challenging some of the myths that still surround the allied victory in 1918, he will also explore the course of the Great War and
its legacy.
Ashley Ekins is head of military history at the Australian War Memorial. A graduate of the University of Adelaide, he specialises in the history of the First World War and the Vietnam War. His publications include: 1918 Year of Victory: the end of the Great War and the shaping of history (ed., 2010, runner-up for the Templer Medal); War Wounds: medicine and the trauma of conflict (ed. with Elizabeth Stewart, 2011); and Gallipoli: a ridge too far (ed., 2013, second, revised edition 2015), a transnational study of the pivotal events of the Gallipoli campaign. He has also written extensively on Australian Army ground operations in Vietnam, including two volumes of the official history: On the Offensive: the Australian Army in the Vietnam War, 1967–1968 (co-authored with Ian McNeill, published 2003); and Fighting to the Finish: the Australian Army and the Vietnam War 1968–1975 (2012).

Mr Frank Walker

Frank Walker is a journalist, international correspondent and author of five non-fiction history books – with one more coming out in September. His book Maralinga on the British atom bomb tests in the South Australian outback and Monte Bello Islands from 1952 to 1963 has been a bestseller, received much acclaim and caused an enormous reaction. It was the first time anyone had detailed the startling stories of the military veterans who participated at the tests including pilots ordered to fly through the radioactive clouds after the explosions,
soldiers ordered into the blast zones within minutes of the bombs going off and the secret tests done on the civilian population to determine the effects of nuclear fallout. The book reveals for the first time the horrifying determination of scientists and governments to take bone samples from dead children to find out how much radiation from the fallout was getting into their bodies – the longest such study in the world – all done under a blanket of secrecy. It reveals how the health and safety of Australian military personnel were totally disregarded – even having them enter the radioactive hot zone in just shorts and boots while the British scientists had complete cover in white overalls and helmets. It shows the complete disregard of the Aboriginal population of the area and the terrible effect the nuclear tests had on them including deaths, birth deformities, ongoing health problems and the destruction of their ancient traditional land. It uncovers government secrecy and the determination of politicians to cover-up the extent of the harm done to the people of Australia and the land. Frank’s other non-fiction books include two revealing dark secrets of the Vietnam War – The Tiger Man of Vietnam and Ghost Platoon – Commandos on daring raids by ANZACS in World War Two, and his latest is Traitors which reveals the hidden history of WW2 where allied industrialists secretly traded with the enemy, captains of allied industry helped bring Hitler to power, and why the allies let so many war criminals to go free after the war.


Registration Costs;

Early Bird HTASA Member $120.00

Early Bird Non-Member $140.00

Early Bird Pre-service $40.00

HTASA Member $140.00

Non-Member $170.00

Pre-service $50.00

Click Here for the workshop details.

The limit of delegates is 150 delegates, venue; The University of Adelaide Club (Union Building), University of Adelaide 8.30a.m. -4.30p.m. Friday 31st August 2018

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Date and Time

Location

University of Adelaide Club

Victoria Drive

Adelaide, SA 5005

Australia

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 1 day before event

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