How Bond researchers are contributing to legal and social change

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Bond University

Building 3, Level 2, Room 26

14 University Drive

Robina, QLD 4226

Australia

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Hosted by the Faculty of Law and Centre for Professional Legal Education

About this event

The Faculty of Law and Centre for Professional Legal Education are proud to host a research showcase featuring the work being carried out by law academics and research students and the impact it is having on our community.

The showcase will begin a series of short presentations on a variety of topics , ranging from the regulation of concussion in Australian sport, space law and sexual assault law to cybersecurity and online privacy.

The presentations will be followed by a lunch in the new rooftop space in the Sustainable building (adjoining Room 3_2_26).

We hope you can join us.

Zoom link: https://bond.zoom.us/j/95026219541

The Program

Steven Freeland -Regulating Space Activities for the Benefit of National and International Communities

This brief discussion will outline the broad governance structure for the exploration and use of outer space and the challenges and opportunities posed by the rapid development of space-related technology. In this context, it will describe how research now undertaken at Bond University Faculty of Law has, and will continue to advise and inform Governments and the United Nations regarding ongoing regulatory frameworks at both the national and international levels.

Fifi Junita, PhD student- National Interest in Foreign Investment in Australia: Proposed Reforms in the Conception of Transnational Legal Process

The adoption of state centrism in the screening system on the ground of national interest in the Australia’s foreign investment policy leads to several deficiencies in terms of substantive and procedural fairness. This policy demonstrates a complexity of realism comprising economic, geopolitical, and ideological elements leading to a more ambiguous policy making. This study strongly argues for more considerable legal certainty and predictability in the application of national interest in FDI regime through the conception of constructivism and transnational legal process theories. These two theories will provide a paradigmatic reform on substantive and procedural accountability mechanisms in the national interest test in FDI.

Oludayo Bamgbose, LLM (Res) student- An investigation of the role of alumni in the advancement of Clinical Legal Education (CLE) in Australia and Nigeria to increase access to justice

Globally, provision of access to justice to citizens has been acknowledged as obligatory on the part of States for the benefits of their citizens regardless of socio-economic status. In achieving this, Governments of nations often make efforts to ensure that citizens who seek to have legal representations are provided with this, as practicable as possible. Notwithstanding this noble intention, in reality, it is not every citizenry, particularly, the indigent ones that can access justice due to a number of inhibiting factors. Situated within the context: Nigeria, this research examines what roles alumni can play in ensuring access to justice to all and sundry. When completed, the outcome of this research could help increase access to justice, particularly, by indigent persons who cannot access justice due to their economic status. It could also potentially help in facilitating smooth transfer of skills to law students who serve as clinicians across law clinics in Nigeria, thereby, helping to advance the course of legal education in Nigeria'.

Alice Taylor-The challenges of prohibiting religious discrimination – the researcher’s perspective

In 2019, the federal government released its proposed bill to prohibit religious discrimination. Since this time, the bill has undergone several revisions with a new draft to be released in the coming weeks. This presentation will outline how research has contributed to the bill and its surrounding debate through submissions, articles, conversations with policy-makers and politicians and the provision of training to the public sector.

Danielle Ireland-Piper-Regulating Power and Authority: Why Cross-Border Laws and Human Rights are relevant to social and legal change

Much of Danielle’s research focuses on the way in which government power is exercised and the consequences that has for human rights. For example, her work on “extraterritoriality” considers the ways in which governments respond to conduct outside Australia and what that means for human rights. Danielle’s research work in this context has addressed issues such as liability under international law, the regulation of transnational crimes, human activity in space, responsibility for cross-border challenges. In this presentation, Danielle considers the different ways in which legal research on power and authority can impact social and legal change.

Jonathan Crowe-Reforming sexual consent law in Queensland

Queensland rape law has a relatively comprehensive and progressive definition of sexual consent by world standards. However, the so-called ‘mistake of fact’ excuse undermines and contradicts that definition. It allows defendants to benefit from old attitudes and rape myths, undoing the practical effects that society’s changing attitudes toward consent have had on the definition itself. Queensland also lags behind other states in implementing an affirmative consent model, which conceptualises consent as ongoing mutual agreement, rather than merely passive non-resistance.

Wendy Bonython-Direct Cab to Brisbane? Voluntary Assisted Dying laws in Queensland

Queensland has recently joined Victoria, Western Australia, South Australia, and Tasmania in passing legislation permitting Voluntary Assisted Dying. Victoria – the first state to successfully legislate – did so after more than 50 unsuccessful attempts by various state parliaments to pass VAD legislation since the Northern Territory’s Rights of the Terminally Ill Act was overturned by the Commonwealth in 1997. Uniquely, Queensland’s laws passed the first time the parliament debated the issue. This talk looks at some of the reasons for that, and suggests there are lessons to be learned for legislators dealing with other ethically and socially complex issues.

Annette Greenhow- Joining the Dots: Researching the Regulation of Concussion in Australian Sport

This presentation is an overview of the decade long evolution in transforming the seeds of a rudimentary idea (who regulates, or ought to regulate, sport-related concussion) into a fully formed field of research activity (reconfiguring this regulatory space). While the contours of this research roadmap—from concept to completion—are fluid, this presentation explains that even ‘dry gullies’ contribute to the overall landscape. The destination is building the case for a coordinated Australian approach and the importance of stakeholder and industry engagement in developing practical solutions.

Dan Svantesson- Contributing to legal and social change in relation to the Internet

In this presentation I will point to a selection of examples of how I have sought to contribute to legal and social change in relation to the Internet. Examples include law reform work through submissions, experiences giving expert evidence and via amicus briefs, and work with international organisations such as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, and the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network.

Date and time

Location

Bond University

Building 3, Level 2, Room 26

14 University Drive

Robina, QLD 4226

Australia

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Organiser Bond University | Research Services

Organiser of How Bond researchers are contributing to legal and social change

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