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ENGG1500 Engineering Thermodynamics (Lectures)

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Hawken Engineering Building (50)

Room T203

St Lucia

Australia

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Thermodynamics is at the heart of many engineering processes and many of the important technical and environmental problems that engineers tackle. This course helps student understand the answers to the following questions:
(1) Will clever engineers one day construct an engine that converts heat energy into mechanical energy with one hundred per cent efficiency?
(2) Why is it so hard to reverse the effects of pollution?
(3) Why are heat pump hot water systems so much more efficient than electrical heaters?
(4) Why does a hot cup of coffee always cool down and never warm up?

Michael is a Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Mathematics and Physics, and Deputy Associate Dean (Academic) in the Faculty of Science.

Professor Drinkwater's astrophysics research concerns the formation of galaxies. He focuses on the competing processes in galaxy groups where most galaxies are growing over time as they merge with one another, but the smaller galaxies can get ripped apart by the gravity of their larger neighbours. This work led to his discovery of an entirely new type of galaxy.

Michael is also active in education innovation and research. He has won institutional and national awards for his use of role-play exercises in university physics teaching and in 2017 he was recognised as a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.


My teaching approach reflects my research background: I’m very comfortable dealing with large amounts of data… such as finding ways to process hundreds of student responses in real time. So that I can prepare for lectures based on the quiz answers in real time.

Walking into a lecture when the students have already prepared and told you what they find difficult in their own words is amazing. The class time becomes a conversation with the students setting the agenda. This is way more fun than conventional lecturing and I know I'm actually discussing something useful for the students. Our tests in another course (PHYS1001, Mechanics and Thermal Physics I) show that students learn more than twice as much with this approach than with conventional teaching: see our paper at http://smp.uq.edu.au/node/2049


If you come to a class, please greet me at the start and I can lend you a clicker. Please sit with the students and feel welcome to join them in the discussions.

Location

Hawken Engineering Building (50)

Room T203

St Lucia

Australia

View Map

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