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Climate Change and Australian Vegetation: Where Are We Headed?

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Fishburners, Sydney Startup Hub

Level 2, 11 York Street

Sydney, NSW 2000

Australia

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Climate Change and Australian Vegetation: Where Are We Headed?

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2021 NSW SCIENCE & RESEARCH BREAKFAST SEMINAR SERIES

Distinguished Professor Belinda Medlyn from Western Sydney University presents:

CLIMATE CHANGE AND AUSTRALIAN VEGETATION: WHERE ARE WE HEADED?

Australian forests and woodlands are well adapted to heat and drought, but this ability is being tested as the climate changes. Rising temperatures, hotter droughts and more frequent fires are already having a major impact and may drive wholesale changes in the future. But what kinds of changes might we expect, and where? Which vegetation types are most at risk? And is rising CO2 a help or a hindrance?

Belinda Medlyn is Distinguished Professor of Ecosystem Modelling at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University. In 2019 she was awarded an ARC Laureate Fellowship to develop a predictive model of Australian vegetation dynamics. In this seminar, Belinda will demonstrate recent research on the effects of CO2 enrichment, heatwaves and drought on Australian vegetation, survey the changes in vegetation already occurring and discuss what the future holds.

ABOUT THE EVENT

The 2021 NSW Science & Research Breakfast Seminar Series will be held at:

Fishburners, Level 2, Sydney Startup Hub, 11 York St, Sydney 2000.

Entry is immediately to the right of Wynyard Station. Take the elevators to Level 2, where an Office of the NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer staff member will direct you.

Breakfast, tea and coffee will be served from 7:15am.

The seminar will commence at 8:00am and conclude by 9:00am. Tea and coffee will be available until 9:30am.

Due to the current NSW Government COVID-19 restrictions, this event can accommodate a maximum of 200 attendees. Registrations will close upon receipt of the first 200 acceptances or by 5:00pm Friday 14 May.

Given this restricted audience capacity, we respectfully request that any confirmed attendee email us at events.rsvp@chiefscientist.nsw.gov.au or phone (02) 9338 6817 should they be unable to attend, to allow for another to be invited in your place.

The 2021 NSW Science & Research Breakfast Seminar Series will also be presented by live stream.

To view, go to chiefscientist.nsw.gov.au/breakfast and click on the live-stream link for the upcoming seminar. This link will be made live shortly before the seminar commences. An edited version of the seminar will subsequently be available on demand at this link.

No registration is necessary for the live stream.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Distinguished Professor Belinda Medlyn

Belinda Medlyn leads the Ecosystem Function and Integration theme at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University. Her research aims to predict how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate change. She collaborates with colleagues around Australia and the world to translate information from plant and ecosystem experiments into models of vegetation function.

In 2018, Belinda launched the Dead Tree Detective – a citizen science initiative helping to inform which trees are vulnerable to drought and dieback and to understand what steps are needed to protect them.

Belinda has an Honours degree in Applied Mathematics from the University of Adelaide and a PhD in Theoretical Biology from UNSW Sydney. In 2019, Belinda received the ARC Georgina Sweet Laureate Fellowship. Her fellowship will enable a rethink of the “pipeline” career model, create resources for non-linear career paths, and support women in high school and university to develop quantitative skills.

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Fishburners, Sydney Startup Hub

Level 2, 11 York Street

Sydney, NSW 2000

Australia

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